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Parks: Bruntsfield Links

By City of Edinburgh Council

By City of Edinburgh Council

Barclay Church at Bruntsfield Links by H Hall

By City of Edinburgh Council

By Contributor Tommy Stocks

By Contributor Tommy Stocks

By Contributor Tommy Stocks

By Contributor Contributor

By Contributor Tommy Stocks

By City of Edinburgh Council

By City of Edinburgh Council

By City of Edinburgh Council

By City of Edinburgh Council

By City of Edinburgh Council

By City of Edinburgh Council

Barclay Bedding display

By Contributor Contributor

By Contributor Mike Shields

Bruntsfield Terrace Entrance

By Contributor Mike Shields

By Contributor Mike Shields

By Contributor Mike Shields

By Contributor Mike Shields

By Contributor Rachel

Spring colour

By Contributor Rachel

Daffodils

By Contributor Rachel

By City of Edinburgh Council

The New Living Landscapes Wildflower Meadow at the top of the Bruntsfield Links short hole Golf Course

By Contributor Rachel

The New Living Landscapes Wildflower Meadow at the top of the Bruntsfield Links short hole golf course

By Contributor Rachel

By Contributor Rachel

Early morning moon

By Contributor Rachel

By Contributor Rachel

Spring Crocus on Bruntsfield Links

By Contributor Rachel

Background
Bruntsfield Links adjoins the Meadows and offers a green place for a relaxing stroll or enjoy a game on the short golf course. Bruntsfield Links is the remainder of the Burgh Muir, which was woodland. In the past, the area has been used as a hunting ground, quarry and became one of the earliest known locations where the game of golf was played in Scotland. The Links was home to several golf clubs, the oldest being the Royal Burgess Club, which traces its roots back to 1735.
Trees in the park include elm, sycamore, maple, ash, lime, whitebeam, cherry, crab apple and oak.
History and heritage
Bruntsfield Links is the easterly part of what was the famous old Borough Muir, wherein 1513 King James IV reviewed his troops before they set off to the fatal field of Flodden. The Borough Muir or Myre, was gifted to the 'Magistrates, Council and Community of the City' by David 1 of Scotland and once extended westwards from what is now the Dalkeith Road area Merchiston, and southwards to the Pow Burn.

In those ancient times, not only did the moor abound with oak trees, but outlaws and Edinburgh outcasts made it their home. It was not a place to be caught after dark, but the Scottish nobility once used it for their hunting ground, when deer and wild boar were plentiful.

"Great stone quarries" are recorded on the site and old Edinburgh Town Centre minutes indicate that one Patrick Carfrae, deacon of the masons, was given permission to dig for stones there in 1599. Quarrying continued on the Links for at least 200 years and rightful concern was expressed from time to time about their depth and danger.
Wildlife
Large flocks of starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) can be seen on the golf course links in the summer – with parents feeding their large brown chicks. In the winter, flocks of redwings descend on the Links and Meadows. These resemble thrushes but have a red breast and are surprisingly confident!
Public Toilets
99 Bruntsfield Place.
Opening times: 10am-8pm.
Disabled 24hr access. All toilets for the disabled require a RADAR key for access.
Why don't you?
Have a go at Short Hole Golf for free. No need to book. Just turn up and play.
Visitor information
Lothian bus routes 11, 15, 15a, 16, 23, 24, 36, 41, 42, 45, 67
Facilities
Short hole golf course (free to play)Toilets
Seating
Annual bedding displays
Play park
Designated barbeque areas
Get Involved
Friends of the Meadows and Bruntsfield Links
Contact Details
Melville Drive
EH9 9EX
0131 529 5151
southeast.locality@edinburgh.gov.uk