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Parks: Inch Park

By City of Edinburgh Council

By City of Edinburgh Council

By City of Edinburgh Council

By City of Edinburgh Council

By City of Edinburgh Council

By City of Edinburgh Council

By Contributor Mike Shields

By Contributor Mike Shields

By Contributor Mike Shields

Creation Of New Pitches At Inch Park

By Contributor Mike Shields

Inch Park Volunteers In Action

By Contributor Mike Shields

Creation On New Rugby Pitch

By Contributor Mike Shields

Winter Inch Park

By Contributor Mike Shields

Inch Park Gilmerton Road Entrance

By Contributor Mike Shields

Inch Park Dalkeith Road Entrance

By Contributor Mike Shields

By Contributor Mike Shields

By Contributor Mike Shields

By Contributor Mike Shields

By Contributor Rachel

By Contributor Rachel

By Contributor Rachel

By Contributor Rachel

May 2015

By Contributor Rachel

May 2015

By Contributor Rachel

By Contributor Rachel

By Contributor Rachel

Wildflower Meadow in full bloom

By Contributor Rachel

By Contributor Rachel

Inch Park cricket wicket in preparation for weekend games July 2015

By Contributor Mike Shields

Knapweed - very important food source for butterflies, particularly: Gatekeeper butterfly, Large Skipper, Lime-speck Pug moth, Meadow Brown, Painted Lady, Peacock, Red Admiral, Small Copper and Small Skipper

By Contributor Rachel

Two 7-spot ladybirds on a yarrow flowerhead

By Contributor Rachel

By Contributor Rachel

By Contributor Rachel

Autumn foliage

By Contributor Rachel

By Contributor Rachel

Inch House

By Contributor Robert McNeill

Background
Inch is the old name for an island or a piece of low-lying land near a river or burn, and the spacious Inch Park fulfils that definition with a section of the Braid Burn still running through its northern edge. It is a large park with tree lined paths, green parkland, copses and woodland borders. Inch House is in the grounds, which is now used as a community centre. The park is home to Lismore Rugby Club and Edinburgh South Cricket Club.
History and heritage
The lands of the Inch, once known as the King's Inch, were granted to the monks of Holyrood in the 16th century and Inch House dates back to 1617. The initials of its first owner, James Winram, are carved on one of the window pediments, dated 1634. The house was extended by the owners in 1891, who also added 19th century details such as the turrets and oriels. In 1946 the house was sold and for a time became a school. Now Inch House is popular adult education and community centre.
Wildlife
The lower park has beech, chestnut, sycamore, elm, copper beech, hawthorn and sorbus. The Braid Burn is clean enough to support small fish and other water life.
Flocks of Swallows (Hirundo rustica) and House Martins (Delichon urbica) are frequently seen alongside the rugby/cricket pitches and by the Braid burn (March/April to September). The house martin is brown with a small white patch on the back and the swallow has longer tail feathers and is more of a dark blue colour.
Why don't you?
Watch a cricket game or rugby match.
Visitor information
Serviced by Lothian bus numbers 3 and 8. Can be accessed from Cameron Toll Shopping Centre, Old Dalkeith Road and Glenallan Drive.
Living Landscape features
Floral meadow (annuals)
Facilities
Play areaRiver
Walks
Football
Cricket
Rugby
Seating
Outdoor gym equipment
Multi use games area
Contact Details
Old Dalkeith Road
EH16 4TD
0131 529 5151
southeast.locality@edinburgh.gov.uk